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CHINA, THE UNITED STATES, AND 21ST CENTURY SEA POWER: DEFINING A MARITIME SECURITY PARTNERSHIP
Author: Erickson, A.S; L.J. Goldstein & N. Li

SKU :- MBN12888

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Naval Institute Press 2010 Hardback 228mm x 156mm 496 pages .

CHINA, THE UNITED STATES, AND 21ST CENTURY SEA POWER: DEFINING A MARITIME SECURITY PARTNERSHIP

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An in-depth assessment of the way forward for two of the World’s biggest Naval powers. China’s reaction to the United States’ new maritime strategy will significantly impact its success according to three Naval War College professors. Based on the premise that preventing wars is as important as winning wars they explain that this new U.S. strategy embodies an historic reassessment of the international system and how the United States can best pursue its interests in cooperation with other nations. The authors contend that despite recent turbulence in military relations between the U.S and China substantial shared interests could enable extensive U.S.-China maritime security cooperation as they attempt to reach an understanding of “competitive coexistence.” For professionals to structure cooperation however they warn that Washington and Beijing must create sufficient political and institutional spaceAbout the Authors: Andrew S. Erickson and Lyle J. Goldstein are associate professors in the U.S. Naval War College’s Strategic Research Department and founding members of its China Maritime Studies Institute (CMSI). They coauthored China Goes to Sea. Nan Li is an associate professor at CMSI.

Additional Information

Author Erickson, A.S; L.J. Goldstein & N. Li
Publisher Naval Institute Press
ISBN 9781591142430
Date of Publication 2010
Edition N/A
Binding Hardback
Book Size 228mm x 156mm
Number of pages 496
Images N/A
Language English Text
SKU MBN12888

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